In Literature, What Is Conceit? (with pictures)

 

conceit in literature

In English literature the term is generally associated with the 17th century metaphysical poets, an extension of contemporary goodlinetoday.ga metaphysical conceit differs from an extended analogy in the sense that it does not have a clear-cut relationship between the things being compared. Helen Gardner observed that "a conceit is a comparison whose ingenuity is more striking than its justness" and. The metaphysical conceit, associated with the Metaphysical poets of the 17th century, is a more intricate and intellectual device. It usually sets up an analogy between one entity’s spiritual qualities and an object in the physical world and sometimes controls the whole structure of the poem. Conceit definition: A conceit is defined as a comparison between two dissimilar things. What is Conceit in Literature? Meaning of conceit: When identifying a comparison as a conceit, it is important to note that these comparisons tend to be elaborate or surprising. Their elaborateness takes place in the form of an extended metaphor between the two unlike things being compared.


Conceit - Examples and Definition of Conceit


A conceit is a kind of metaphor that compares two very unlike things in a surprising and clever way. Metaphysical poet John Donne was known for his conceits often called metaphysical conceits.

His poem " The Flea " uses a pesky little bug to talk about, um, wanting to get it on with the speaker's lady love. Sex and insects? An unlikely pair, sure, but the unexpected originality of the contrast fuels the poem's seductive conceit in literature. Plus it helps the speaker make the argument: the fact that a flea has already bitten both the speaker and the object of his affections means that she has no reason to be, um, less than welcoming in the bedroom.

All rights reserved, conceit in literature. Home Literature Glossary conceit. Know your literary terms. Over literary terms, Shmooped to perfection. Conceit Definition: A conceit is a conceit in literature of metaphor that compares two very unlike things in a surprising and clever way, conceit in literature. Related Words: MetaphorSimile. Tags: GeneralPoetryFigurative Language. Logging out…. Logging out You've been inactive for a while, logging you out in a few seconds I'm Still Here!

W hy's T his F unny?

 

What is Conceit in Literature? Definition, Examples of Literary Conceit - Writing Explained

 

conceit in literature

 

In English literature the term is generally associated with the 17th century metaphysical poets, an extension of contemporary goodlinetoday.ga metaphysical conceit differs from an extended analogy in the sense that it does not have a clear-cut relationship between the things being compared. Helen Gardner observed that "a conceit is a comparison whose ingenuity is more striking than its justness" and. Conceit. Definition: A conceit is a kind of metaphor that compares two very unlike things in a surprising and clever way. Often, conceits are extended metaphors that dominate an entire passage or poem. Metaphysical poet John Donne was known for his conceits (often called metaphysical conceits). His poem "The Flea" uses a pesky little bug to talk about, um, wanting to get it on with the. Conceit definition: A conceit is defined as a comparison between two dissimilar things. What is Conceit in Literature? Meaning of conceit: When identifying a comparison as a conceit, it is important to note that these comparisons tend to be elaborate or surprising. Their elaborateness takes place in the form of an extended metaphor between the two unlike things being compared.